Thursday, March 30, 2017

Charles, Ted And A Pocket Full Of Dimes



I remember one year that I went to Marshall to visit. I was not in high school at the time and loved going to Marshall.
Charles came by my aunt's house, picked me up and walked back to his house on Wilson Street.

Aunt Sedalia was there making hats and I of course was fascinated with that because she had several beautiful ones that she had finished.

All Charles  talked about was wanting me to stay in Marshall and go to school. I actually was fascinated by the thought of staying and going to H.B. Pemberton.

Charles took me to a football game that week-end where I fell in love with their marching band.

I was amazed with the way they danced and  marched to the tune of "Hit The Road Jack" a song that Ray Charles had sung.

We did not have that high speed marching band in Phoenix where I lived.

Speaking of songs:

 Charles took me to a cafe where we got a Dr Pepper and sat down at one of the booths . He reached in his pocket and pulled out a huge handful of dimes.



I don't remember if anyone else was in the cafe but I do remember that he put a whole lot of dimes in the Jukebox and played the same song over and over.

The song sung by Ted Taylor was called Be Ever Wonderful.



 I think cousin Charles thought he was Ted Taylor because he sang right along with it.  Not to mention they shared the same last name.😀



I was in awe of my cousin who was one of the most caring people persons in the world that I knew and one of the funniest who kept you laughing.

Over the years whenever I heard that song, I thought about Charles and  laughed about him having all those dimes just to play that song.

Be ever Wonderful, Stay as you are
Be ever Heavens, gift my guiding star
You are the only one who can break my heart
You are the only one who can tear us apart

I now believe that Charles was singing that song to an unknown love who came into his life years later in the form of Vivian Brown the love of his life.  I can say with certainty that he loved him some Vivian.
He stayed with me in Phoenix for a couple weeks and told me he was going to marry the girl of his dreams from Daingerfield.

Stay sweet and true
Be ever loving me as I love you
Darling please take my heart
Til the end of time

Well Cousin you are Heavens gift, and God's shining star. Those dimes, they are the twinkling stars that light up the night.  Rest well Cousin, rest well.







Wednesday, February 1, 2017

They Rose So We Could Rise



February is Black History Month.

It started out as Negro Week by Dr. Carter G Woodson and others in 1926 who wanted to highlight those African Americans who had given of themselves for the betterment of their race and give others encouragement to do the same.

Decades later Negro Week evolved into Black History Month, and celebrated nationally.

I do recognize those who fit in this category and have been blessed to know that many of them have made an impact on my life’s thinking.

My highlighted pick  just happens to be a group of men and women, and boys and girls.                             
They are found on numerous slave manifests by the thousands. 

They rose as the were identified on a one name basis and the color of their skin.

   source Information: Ancestry.com New Orleans, Louisiana, Slave Manifests 1807-1860

This group of people knew the agony of defeat all too well but they rose.

They rose to the occasion to carry on despite the rushing of the cold waters of the ocean pounding in their ears.

They rose despite the call of the greedy yelling “Sold to the man over there” who was a lot more greedy.

They rose to the treacherous hot sun in the noon day to the howl of the animals at night as they bent to please the greedy.
Row by row by back breaking row and still they rose.

They rose to the sound of the galloping horses hooves, mounted by United States Colored Troops and some marching along in the back and some on the side. 

They rose as some gave nods of approval as if to bid them well in silence .

They rose even though they  had no choice but to be used as a suckling machine.
They toiled over hot biscuits and pork taking time to weave and spin before the nights end to get their rest.

They rose as they sent their children to one room shacks miles away from home early in the morning to pick up a shared and tattered reader.
They learned to read and count one plus one equals two, two by two equals four.

They rose against the battering of night sticks as John Lewis and others walked across the William Pettis Bridge.

They rose over hills in many a foreign land and took flight as giant wings escorted many a man to be able to make it homeward bound.

They rose to hear Shirley St. Hill Chisolm announce her run for President.

They rose for Mississippi’s Fannie  Lou Townsend Hamer words “I am sick and tired of being sick and tired” as she fought for racial justice.

They rose to bring forth the seeds sprinkled across this land to make many of us. 

They Rose So We Could Rise!